4 minutes read

What to consider when starting a new brand

When starting a new brand, it's easy to get caught up in the excitement of the next big thing. You've got an idea for something and want to build it from the ground up, but there's so much more that goes into making your brand than just having a vision.

Introduction

When starting a new brand, it’s easy to get caught up in the excitement of the next big thing. You’ve got an idea for something and want to build it from the ground up, but there’s so much more that goes into making your brand than just having a vision. Building a brand is not just about creating something that looks good—it’s about building something that speaks to people and makes them want to engage with it or buy from you. As we’ve seen many times before (think Blackberry or Kodak), if you don’t take care of your branding early on, it can leave you vulnerable as someone else comes along with a better product offering. Here are some tips on how to make sure that never happens:

The name

Once you’ve chosen a name, you’ll need to check that another company still needs to start using it. You can enter your potential brand name into Google’s search engine and search for matches. If any results from other companies match your name exactly or with slight changes, try adjusting to it until no matches are found.

You also want to ensure that there are no obvious spelling errors in your new brand name before finalizing anything!

The colours

When deciding on a colour palette, you should consider the following:

  • Colours that are in your logo. If you can, use these colours to enhance your brand identity.
  • Colours that are in your brand identity. Your brand identity comprises several elements, including logo and tagline, language and visuals (photos or drawings). If the overall look of these items is cohesive enough, they may all be able to share a standard colour palette too!
  • Colours that are in your brand personality. As mentioned above, each company has unique character traits—which should reflect in its visual design as much as possible! For example: if one of your values is creativity and innovation (especially when it comes to social media), then choosing an unconventional shade for an otherwise generic-looking website could help establish this tone from day one!
  • Tone of voice

The font

Fonts are important. They can communicate the mood of your brand, as well as who it is for and what message you’re trying to convey. For example, I often use a font called “Unlock” for my logo and other design work because it looks professional but playful with its hand-drawn look. It’s perfect for showing off my love of technology while still staying true to being approachable and friendly—two crucial components of our brand personality at Hello Code!

The logo

The logo is the face of your brand. It’s what people see first, so it should be simple, memorable, timeless, and flexible enough to last as long as your company does. Your logo must also be scalable for any medium: small or large format (e.g., letterhead, business cards), 2D or 3D; printed on paper or posted online.

In general terms:

  • A good logo must be simple. The simpler a logo is, the more easily recognizable it will be in various sizes and applications (2D vs 3D). And that’s important because making something look complicated takes time and effort—and money!
  • A good logo should have a strong shape that can hold up even when reduced to tiny sizes without losing its purposeful form or meaning. This is where typography comes into play—it can help define what kind of shape works best for what type of company you have while still being readable at smaller sizes (e.g., on social media platforms).

Your brand is the most valuable asset you will ever own. It’s who you are and what you stand for.

Your brand is the most valuable asset you will ever own. It’s who you are and what you stand for. Your customers expect a certain quality from your products, service and even the way you talk about yourself in your marketing materials. If they don’t experience those things, then they’ll go elsewhere to get them.

A good brand sets expectations for what customers can expect from an organization through its products or services and how that organization behaves in general (e.g., environmentally friendly). To build a strong and trusted brand, it’s essential to have an idea about what kind of values should be represented by this entity to achieve its objectives successfully over time – especially if it takes years before reaching profitability!

Conclusion

Branding is a vast topic, and we’ve only covered a few crucial aspects here. However, keeping these principles in mind as you create your brand will be easier to manage in the long run.

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